Call to U.S. Women Artists: Deadline May 20, 2011

Man As Object – Reversing the Gaze, curated by Karen Gutfreund & Priscilla Otani, will be exhibited November 4 – 26, 2011 as part of SOMArts’ Commons Curatorial Residency program. This call is open to all U.S. women artists and there is no entry fee required. Full prospectus and online entry form can be found here. Questions should be directed to Karen Gutfreund (karengutfreund@yahoo.com).

More About this Exhibition:

The goal of this exhibition Man as Object – Reversing the Gaze is to turn the tables and to exhibit works that put the male in the position of art subject and spectacle. What does it mean to objectify men? What does it mean to reverse the (male) gaze? What are the visible signs of maleness and masculinity? How are feminist artists challenging societal views regarding men and masculinity?

The exhibition will examine the visibility of men and masculinity from female/feminist/transgender perspectives. In so doing it necessarily problematizes notions of ‘men,’ ‘male,’ ‘masculinity,’ ‘women’ and ‘female’ while exploring new possibilities for the gaze. This is an inclusive show, and we welcome women and transgender artists to challenge what it means for ‘women’ to look at ‘men.’

 

Not only will the male figure be taking on the historically ‘female’ or passive role as object of the gaze, but the surveyor is now positioned as active and critical of traditional gender roles, thus creating a truly feminist stance. The male body and its gender expression become spectacle for a woman’s viewing and contemplation. Surveying the ways men are represented in contemporary art by women, this exhibition will open new dialogues regarding the myriad of ways how women view men in today’s culture and society.

This exhibition will explore women’s responses to a male dominated world in a different way than an exhibition of women’s images of themselves. It will mark an important development in Feminist Art, which has long concentrated on images of women meant to challenge stereotypical notions of womanhood. A gallery filled with works depicting men, created by women, actively resists the prevalence of the male gaze in art as well as the continued domination of male artists exhibiting in galleries and museums.