Life and Death: A Community Conversation on Capital Punishment

What: Life and Death: A Community Conversation on Capital Punishment

Where: SOMArts Cultural Center, 934 Brannan St. (between 8th and 9th) San Francisco, CA

When: Thursday, January 10, 2013, 6–8 pm

How much:  Free admission, RSVP on Facebook here

A diverse set of viewpoints is necessary to understand the breadth of issues that arise in the controversy around capital punishment. The voices represented in Life and Death: A Community Conversation on Capital Punishment engage the issue through the lens of gender in prisons today, litigation and criminal defense and personal experience.

The conversation will be audience-participatory and raise all voices in respectful community dialog. All perspectives are welcome.

This event affords a rare opportunity to come together in light of the recent defeat of California Proposition 34, an initiative to repeal the death penalty, and discuss how this decision unfolded, what the diversity of voices on the issue could mean and how to move forward in the conversation of human rights, justice and prison reform.

The conversation will be audience-participatory and raise all voices in respectful community dialog. All perspectives are welcome.

Moderated by Laura Magnani, Assistant Regional Director of American Friends Service Committee, San Francisco, confirmed panelists include Jerry Elster, an organizer from All of Us Or None, Sarah Fontaine of the California Coalition for Women Prisoners, Frances Luster, who lost her son in an execution-style homicide in San Francisco in 1990, Natasha Minsker, campaign manager for Proposition 34, and Elisabeth A. Semel, faculty member and Director of the Death Penalty Clinic at University of California, Berkeley, School of Law.

Life and Death: A Community Conversation on Capital Punishment accompanies SOMArts’ exhibition Speak Your Peace, January 4–January 24, 2013, curated by SOMArts’ Curator & Gallery Director Justin Hoover.  The exhibition brings together Bay Area-based painters, digital, video and installation artists ranging in age, ethnicity and nationality to explore intercultural communication and social justice and propose new iconographies of peace through visual art.

Image credit: Richard Kamler, “The Waiting Room”